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Top 10 Cartoon Logos That Have Stood the Test of Time

Top 10 Cartoon Logos That Have Stood the Test of Time

we all know what cartoons are, right? Those entertaining animated shows kept us on the screen during our early years. However, have you ever wondered about the logos of those classic cartoons? They aren’t just random sketches but iconic symbols imploding into popular culture.

This article ranks the top ten cartoon logos that have lasted throughout time. Ranging from the vintage appeal of the 1930s to present-day wonders, these signs were able to seize our minds and never let them go. So lean back, prepare a hot drink for yourself and let’s take a ride down memory lane!

1. Mickey Mouse (Walt Disney)

Mickey Mouse Logo Design

When talking about classic cartoon emblems, it would be unfair to ignore Mickey Mouse's silhouette; essentially, this was the very first. Its simplicity lies in its greatness; even though it has been used since 1928, it remains fresh in memory. 

The round design with a profile of Mickey that can be recognised instantly is a classic example of how simple logos can be powerful. This mark is known to generations because it still expresses fun, laughter, and old-fashioned family entertainment.

If at all possible, what makes me more amazed by this logo is its ability to change over time while keeping true to itself at heart — or should I say head? 

From the black-and-white era until now, when they made him colourful again, those ears that never changed constantly reminded us of Disney magic through all these years. And did you ever wonder why they gave him those big round things for ears anyway? It was so that animators could quickly turn his head around! Talk about form follows function!

2. Looney Tunes (Warner Bros.)

Looney Tunes Logo Design

The Mickey Mouse logo design is simple; The Looney Tunes’ mark represents chaos – albeit in the most beautiful way.

This emblem has characters such as Porky Pig, Daffy Duck, and Bugs Bunny. It’s a visual smorgasbord that perfectly reflects the spirit of madcap comedy in each cartoon episode: an ever-shifting kaleidoscope full of pranks and capers in vibrant technicolour as shown on these programs.

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Still, among all this craziness, there is something about it that keeps us coming back time after time again; perhaps because underneath all those shenanigans, we can find some familiarities, or not. Who doesn’t want to see Daffy Duck having another tantrum or watch Bugs Bunny chowing down on carrots?

Over its lifetime, the Looney Tunes logo has seen more than 20 versions created featuring various characters added, taken away and moved around like pieces on a game board. It’s almost like an ongoing changing joke that only people who are really into it know about!

3. The Simpsons (20th Television)

The Simpsons Cartoon Logos

The Simpsons are the show that taught us that it is typical (and funny) to have a broken family and an oddball cast of supporting characters.

At the centre of this cultural icon is a logo that perfectly captures the show's spirit—a basic, doodled outline of their name. It’s a logo that looks like Bart could’ve scribbled during one of his many detentions.

But that’s what makes it so lovable. This logo doesn’t take itself too seriously, just like the show. It reminds us that sometimes, the simplest things in life can become iconic.

This brand mark was designed by Matt Groening himself in just 15 minutes while he was waiting to pitch the show to producers. Genius under pressure!

4. Tom and Jerry (MGM Cartoons)

Tom And Jerry Cartoon Logo Design

Tom and Jerry are the best slapstick comedy cartoon. The logo is a representation of their endless chase.

The straightforward, still powerful style shows them constantly moving, with Jerry one step ahead of Tom. This symbolises their never-ending game of cat-and-mouse perfectly (pun intended).

Nevertheless, what makes this badge so great is that it’s timeless. Many different age groups have watched these two characters fool around for years without changing the emblem, which means people must like it!

While they may be enemies forever, not once have words been spoken by either party involved in the show ‘Tom and Jerry’. They entertain us through physical comedy alone!

5. Scooby-Doo (Hanna-Barbera)

Scooby Doo Logo Design Cartoon

Regarding vintage cartoon logos, few are as universally recognisable as the Scooby-Doo logo. This emblem does an excellent job of representing the program’s combination of comedy with spooky elements.

At its core is the famous giant puppy known as Scooby-Doo himself; his tongue lolls out from that famously idiotic face. Around him are the other members of Mystery Inc., each with their unique style and personality.

What makes this emblem unique, though, is how old it feels. The colours pop like they would have in 1969 (when this show first aired), and so does that groovy lettering!

When naming the original series, they almost went with “Who’s S-S-Scared?” or “Mysteries Five”. But eventually someone said “Scooby-Doo” and everybody else said “yeah”.

6. Powerpuff Girls (Cartoon Network)

Powerpuff Girls Logo Design

In a male-dominated world of superhero cartoons, the Powerpuff Girls came in like a breath of fresh air with their cute and bubbly logo – and a lot of girl power.

This emblem is an accurate representation of the three small but mighty main characters of the show, Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup: each one has its own colour scheme as well as a facial expression which are easily recognisable; at the same time, being shaped like a heart, it gives them some kind sweetness in addition to being superheroes.

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However, don’t judge this book by its cover because underneath all that adorable cuteness lies one powerful punch that is just as intense, if not stronger, than anything those girls can throw. It serves as a reminder that even little people have great strength.

The Powerpuff Girls were initially conceived by creator Craig McCracken as “a short burst of superhero” while he was studying at CalArts. He must’ve had no idea what kind of cultural phenomenon his doodle would become!

7. Dexter's Laboratory (Cartoon Network/Hanna-Barbera)

Dexters Laboratory Cartoon Logo Design

Out of all cartoon logos, Dexter’s Laboratory is a quirky masterpiece with science.

Dexter’s secret laboratory lies behind him as he triumphantly stands in front of it in the logo – this is where science and madness come together in the best possible way.

However, what sets this logo apart is how intricately designed it is; there are nooks and crannies galore! Whether you’ve always wanted to own a mad scientist’s lair or not, beakers, test tubes, buttons and levers offer quite a visual treat.

And then there’s that iconic purple colour scheme, which makes everything even more bizarrely delightful. It represents the genius/chaos combination perfectly described in this show.

Were you aware that “Dexter’s Laboratory” was initially considered a short film before becoming an entire series? Genndy Tartakovsky based some aspects of his childhood love for science and technology.

8. SpongeBob SquarePants (Nickelodeon)

Spongebob Squarepants Logo Design

Talking about cartoon logos that have stood the test of time, few can compete with the popularity of SpongeBob SquarePants.

This logo is an excellent example of how simplicity can be beautiful. In its centre sits the grinning face of a sponge (which has no ears, so it should instead be eye to eye). The bright red and yellow combination is instantly recognisable even from afar.

However, what makes this logo genuinely unique is its ability to represent the show’s quirky and irreverent nature. Just glancing at SpongeBob’s cheerful yet slightly deranged expression will transport you into Bikini Bottom – an underwater world full of strange creatures and even stranger happenings.

Did you know that Stephen Hillenburg invented SpongeBob’s iconic laugh (“Ar-ar-ar-ar-ar!”) as a joke to annoy his fellow writers during an episode creation process? It turned out to be one of the most famous laughs in history!

9. The Flintstones (Hanna-Barbera)

The Flintstones Logo Design

In the realm of classic cartoon logos, few are more legendary or enduring than that of The Flintstones.

This logotype is perfect because it reflects what the show is about a modern Stone Age family. It features the Flintstones' iconic barefooted, club-wielding pose against rocks and trees.

However, what makes this logo so unique is its creative use of typography. With bold letters carved out like stone blocks, it instantly transports you back to Bedrock City, where everything was prehistoric, including TV shows.

Also worth mentioning would be the colours used – warm earth tones, which go along with the caveman theme pretty well, giving off some vintage vibes, if you know what I mean.

The Flintstones was television’s first animated prime-time series aimed at adults, paving the way for many others like it. It’s incredible how innovative a program about cavepeople could be!

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10. Courage the Cowardly Dog (Cartoon Network/Stretch Films)

Courage The Cowardly Dog Logo Design

Last but not the least on our list is Courage the Cowardly Dog logo – a horror-comedy classic and story of an underdog.

The logo may be creepy at first sight. The dim, swirled mess of colours with twisted letters perfectly matches the Cryptic vibes that show off it.

But what’s really at the centre of everything is Courage himself, this scared little pup who always saves everyone no matter how frightened he is.

It’s precisely this mix of terror and tenderness that makes the “Courage” logo so great. It proves that even the most improbable heroes can conquer their deepest phobias – and still look adorable while doing it, too!

John R. Dilworth, creator of CTD, made the iconic squeaky toy sound effect that is heard throughout every episode using nothing more than a rawhide dog chew toy! That’s dedication for you!

Conclusion

So here they are – the top ten cartoon logos that have burned into our brains forever. From the classic cuteness of Mickey Mouse to the creepy whimsy of Courage the Cowardly Dog, these emblems know how to sum up their shows.

But these symbols mean more than good design. They’re also about childhood, imagination, and fun-time honoured. They remind us that sometimes what’s most iconic and lasting can be found in the simplest things.

Therefore, do this: when next you sit down for some animated entertainment, spare a thought for its opening image — because beneath that deceptively naïve logo lies nostalgia, originality, and pure, unadulterated delight.

FAQs about Cartoon Logos

What makes for a great cartoon logo?

A good cartoon logo must be easily identifiable, embody the show's spirit and have a timeless quality that resonates with viewers of all ages.

Why are cartoon logos so iconic?

Cartoon logos are iconic because they represent the shows we grew up watching and loving. They bring back feelings of nostalgia and familiarity that stick with us throughout our lives.

How have cartoon logos changed over time?

While some cartoons have kept their logos virtually untouched for years or even decades, others may have undergone slight modifications or updates to keep things fresh. However, most of these logos’ core essences remain intact, ensuring recognisability among fans.

Can you think of any other memorable cartoon logos?

Definitely! Here are some more examples of famous cartoon characters: Bugs Bunny, Yogi Bear, The Jetsons, The Smurfs and The Rugrats — just to name a few.

Why is simplicity essential in design?

Simplicity is vital when creating an effective symbol. People must recognise what something represents at first glance, especially if passing by quickly on foot (or scrolling through online pages).

What role does colour play in graphic design?

Colour can evoke different emotions or moods depending on which ones are used where; this applies not only within individual compositions but also across entire brands as well. Additionally, certain hues, such as warm vs cool tones, may cause more attention-grabbing effects than others when placed together side-by-side.

What part does typography typically play in logo designs?

Typography often serves as another way for creators/designers/brands/etc. Communicate messages visually while still keeping things simple; from bold chisel-like lettering styles associated with action-packed adventures down towards whimsical hand-drawn scripts telling tales about friendships among woodland creatures– there seems like no end point here since there truly exists such depth between each typeface choice made throughout an overall design composition.

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How do cartoon logos affect merchandising and branding efforts?

Cartoon characters are one of the most recognisable things people can latch onto when it comes to selling products; therefore, these beloved animated beings often become central figures around which entire campaigns evolve – whether for t-shirts, toys, video games or even theme park attractions.

Can you think of a logo that has changed dramatically over time?

An example I could give would have to concern itself with none other than Looney Tunes. Over several years, many different characters were added, subtracted or repositioned about one another to reflect changes behind the scenes amongst this iconic cast of animated stars.

Why do some cartoon logos include multiple characters together within them?

Some creators feel showing all members of their ensemble casts gives viewers better glimpses into each personality type represented throughout various relationships shared among such individuals who reside within particular fictional universes imagined by said creatives themselves.

What effect does a well-crafted logo have on the success of a show?

A memorable and expertly crafted emblem can make a difference where ratings are concerned; this is because it helps establish what’s commonly referred to as brand recognition, thus fostering feelings associated with nostalgia and familiarity among audiences who have seen the said image before now representing everything about the program which resonates most deeply within hearts and minds leading ultimately not only more significant viewership numbers but heightened interest levels shown towards merchandise related directly back into these shows themselves too.

Can you think of any examples where humour meets horror in cartoons’ logotypes?

Indeed – Courage: The Cowardly Dog Show might come across someone’s mind when thinking about illustrations that successfully combine elements representative of both funny sides plus darker aspects found throughout various visual representations related primarily towards the children’s animation genre.

How have famous cartoons affected society through the arts & entertainment industries?

Iconic animations left indelible marks upon culture worldwide via multiple creative mediums like painting, music composition, or written works, where they were often reimagined into new contexts, forever cementing their status among universally treasured icons within our collective memories.

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Stuart Crawford

Stuart Crawford is an award-winning creative director and brand strategist with over 15 years of experience building memorable and influential brands. As Creative Director at Inkbot Design, a leading branding agency, Stuart oversees all creative projects and ensures each client receives a customised brand strategy and visual identity.

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